DAY CAMP

Brewster – Dream Day at Cape Cod

A camp for seriously ill children up to age 18 and their families. Services a range of diagnoses: cancer, HIV, sickle cell, heart conditions, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis and more. Camp is free for the entire family. For More information visit www.dreamdayoncapecod.com

 

Bridgewater – Bridge Center Special Needs Camps

Camp Connect for ages 5-22 with Asperger’s Syndrome, High Functioning Autism, and related disorders. Camp Discover for ages 4-22 regardless of the nature or severity of their disabilities. Camp Summit for ages 6-22 with severe behavioral challenges. Plus several more camps for disabilities. For more information contact Anna Wood , 508-697-7557 ext. 23 or visit http://www.thebridgectr.org/summer-camp.aspx

 

 Duxbury – Camp Wee-Kan-Tu at Camp Wing in Duxbury

Sponsored by the Epilepsy Foundation of MA & RI for children and teens ages 8-17 with epilepsy. 617.506.6041 ext. 11, or cvilardi@efmri.org or The Epilepsy of MA & RI

 

Easton – Camp HOPe, Easton, MA

For ages 8 – 18 with a variety of disabilities, traditional camp activities and field trips. Call 508-205-0555, email k.desisito@houseofpossibilities.org or visit  www.houseofpossibilities.org

 

East Sandwich, Riverview School Summer Program

Grades 6-12. July 12 – Aug. 14, 2015. For campers with complex language, learning and cognitive disabilities, focus on recreational activities, academics, personal growth , social skills training, and independent living. Visit Riverview School or contact admissions@riverviewschool.org  or 508-888-0489 ext. 206.

 

Hanover – Cardinal Cushing Centers’ ACHIEVE Program, Hanover, MA

Transition program serves 17 -23 years old with mild to moderate intellectual or developmental disabilities, autism or Down syndrome.  Visit www.coletta.org or call 781-829-1205.

 

Hanover – South Shore YMCA, Camp Gordon Clark

Campers are fully integrated into this traditional day camp experience and should be able to participate independently into standard staff ratios (6 years and under – 1:5, 7 years and above - 1:10). If more supports are needed, a Sensory Smart Camp is offered on a select week providing a 1:4 ratio and shorter days. CGC is an outdoor camp featuring natural, wooded terrain. Campers should be able to traverse from site to site independently.

contact ecasagrande@ssymca.org or 781-829-8585 x8316 or visit http://ssymca.org/camps/day-camps/

 

Norwell – Nature Adventures Day Camp at South Shore Natural Science Center

Inclusion supports now offered at South Shore YMCA Day Camps. For more information contact ecasagrande@ssymca.org  or 781-829-8585 x8316 or visit http://ssymca.org/camps/day-camps/

Rockland – Sing Explore Create Accessible Music and Art

Summer programs for art, painting, drawing, classes, music lessons, music therapy and more. Contact 781-803-2117  or ncraven@singexplorecreate.com

 

Scituate’s CORSE – Inclusive Camps

CORSE Foundation All Stars camps provide recreation for children with and without special needs up to age 22 who would prefer a less competitive atmosphere. Includes a Youth Camp, Gym Program, Field Trips, Maritime Water Adventures, the “I Can Bike” program and more. For more information visit the Corse Foundation Programs Page.

 

West Bridgewater  – Wild Hearts Summer Horse Camp, West Bridgewater

Activities include grooming and bathing horses, obstacle courses designed to match the ability level of each participant, and individualized attention. For further registration information,visit the Wild Hearts page or call 617-970-6235

TIPS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT CAMP

TYPES OF CAMPS

There are different types of camps that provide a variety of choices based on your camper’s interests and needs. 

Specialty Camps: Camps are considered a specialty camp when they serve a specific population exclusively. Examples include camps that serve specifically and solely children with Down Syndrome, children with Autism, cerebral palsy, etc. Benefits of specialty camp programs can include children meeting peers with similar disabilities or illnesses, an ability to focus on teaching coping skills specific to the illness or disability, and ease of social inclusion.

Inclusive Camps: Camps are considered inclusive when they serve both children with and without disabilities. Benefits of inclusive camp programs can include opportunities to interact with peers of all ability levels as well as an ability to teach social acceptance for those traits that make us different and unique.

Day Camp: Programs that run during daytime only. Examples of day camps can include YMCA and municipal or community based parks and recreation programs.

Residential Camp: A residential camp is one where the children stay overnight. Resident camps can vary in terms of length of stay. Most residential camps serving children with disabilities or chronic illnesses tend to be one or two weeks in length.